Product Recall Alert: Serena & Lily Nash Convertible Crib

Product Recall Alert: Serena & Lily Nash Convertible Crib

Your baby’s sleep environment is vitally important. In fact, we’ve written blog posts in the past about making sure that your baby’s crib is safe as possible. After all, our goal at Child Safety Store is to help keep your little ones protected and safe. As our loyal readers know, sometimes this means that we must also alert you of product recalls that can present a harmful situation for your family. Today, we’ll be discussing the Nash Convertible Crib by Serena & Lily. This crib was recalled this past week due to a potential injury hazard. 

Why Was This Item Recalled?

This modern-designed crib has simple white slats with a warm oak frame. It was sold in a kit that includes toddler bed rails. This conversion kit allows the crib to transform as your child grows. Sadly, as we mentioned above, Serena & Lily recently recalled the crib portion of this kit due to a potential injury hazard. 

Thankfully, there have been no injuries associated with the Nash Convertible Crib. However, Serena & Lily did receive five reports in which of the crib’s leg partially detached from the headboard/footboard. Your little one is your most precious cargo. Obviously, these reports are alarming. If a baby is inside the crib when the leg detaches, this can potentially cause very serious injuries. 

What to Do if You Have a Serena & Lily Nash Convertible Crib

The Nash Convertible Crib was sold in Serena & Lily stores nationwide and via Serena & Lily’s catalog, as well as at SerenaandLily.com.  It was available between September 2018 and April 2020 for about $900. 

So, what do you do if you have this item in your child’s nursery? First, you should stop using the crib. Given the potential for injury, it is best to find other sleep arrangements for your baby until the problem is resolved. 

Next, you should contact Serena & Lily directly so the crib can be repaired, replaced or refunded. Here are your options:

  • choose a new headboard and footboard, plus a coupon for $250 (good for one year from date of issue)
  • replace the crib
  • exchange the crib for another Serena & Lily crib of equivalent value
  • request a full refund

To this end, Serena & Lily is contacting all purchasers of recalled cribs directly.  However, you can also contact them at 866-597-2742 (7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. PT, Monday through Friday or from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. PT on Saturday). 

Official Details for the Serena & Lily Nash Convertible Crib Recall

Here are the full details on the Serena & Lily Nash Convertible Crib recall, as provided by the Consumer Product Safety Commission:

Description:

This recall involves Serena & Lily Nash Convertible cribs, which features a white finish with oak trim and can convert to a toddler bed.  The crib is sold as part of a kit that includes the crib and toddler bed rails.  The kit was sold under SKU CRIB10-NC1, which was printed on the order and confirmation.  The crib itself, which is a component of the kit, bears a label with one of the following PO numbers and manufacturing date:

  • PO: 10320091, Date: 06-2018

  • PO: 10327234, Date: 08-2018

  • PO: 10361800, Date: 07-2019

  • PO: 10365097, Date: 08-2019

Remedy:

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled cribs and contact Serena & Lily for a repair, replacement or refund.  Consumers can choose a replacement headboard and footboard to repair the crib, plus a coupon for $250 good for one year from date of issue; replace the Nash Convertible Crib; exchange for another Serena & Lily crib of equivalent value; or a full refund.  Serena & Lily is contacting all purchasers of recalled cribs directly.

Incidents/Injuries:

Serena & Lily has received 5 reports of the leg partially detaching from the headboard/footboard.  No injuries have been reported.

Sold At:

Serena & Lily stores nationwide, through the Serena & Lily Catalog and online at SerenaandLily.com from September 2018 through April 2020 for about $900.

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